Direct Flame Paint Booths

Direct flame paint booths are a widely used heating method in painting booths, where natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is used as the fuel. Also commonly known as “air vein” booths, they feature an extended flame on a burner with holes through which process air passes. These heating systems are preferred for painting and drying large surfaces, such as buses, trucks, ships, or boats, and are also frequently used in the metalworking industry.

Direct Flame Paint Booths: How They Work

These paint booths use a burner, where a flame of natural gas or LPG acts as the heat source for both painting and drying processes. The direct flame in contact with the air (eliminating the need for a combustion chamber) generates a flow of hot air that circulates evenly inside the booth, significantly accelerating the paint curing process and improving application quality.

They are relatively easy to install and require less maintenance compared to original equipment manufacturer paint systems. In general, direct flame paint booths consist of the following elements:

Booth Body: This is the part where the spraying takes place. The panels that make up the walls are usually made of metal or other heat-resistant materials. The paneling is insulated with materials like rock wool or fiberglass to retain heat and reduce noise impact.
Decades ago, when heating systems took a long time to reach the set temperature, installations were divided into two sections: one for spraying and the other for drying. Today, combined systems are used, where both phases occur in the same location.

Gas Combustion System: The thermally ventilated unit is equipped with a gas combustion system that produces a modulating flame along a burner. The direct flame generates a large amount of heat, used to rapidly dry the applied paint on the product’s surface.

Air Filtration Systems: The paint booth is equipped with multiple air filtration systems, such as pocket or cartridge filters, ceiling filters, or floor filters that trap impurities from both the outside air and overspray particles, contributing to a clean and safe working environment.

Ventilation: Paint booths have ventilation systems that ensure adequate air circulation inside the booth, especially when using water-based paints. This prevents overspray buildup and speeds up the drying phase.

Lighting: The booth must be equipped with lighting of at least 750 lux, high efficiency, and preferably LED to ensure optimal visibility during the painting process. Glare should be minimized to avoid mistakes and fatigue.

Temperature Control System: All direct flame paint booths are equipped with temperature control systems, allowing the regulation of the temperature inside the booth based on the product’s painting requirements.

Direct flame paint booths can be customized to meet the specific needs of various industrial or artisanal sectors.

Applications of Direct Flame Paint Booths

Direct flame paint booths are used in various production sectors, including:

Automotive Industry: Direct flame paint booths are often used in the automotive industry for painting vehicle bodies and large parts, such as trucks, buses, or industrial vehicles.

Metalworking Industry: Direct flame paint booths are also used in the metalworking industry for painting large parts, such as industrial machinery, material handling equipment, pipes, production plant components, and more.

Maritime Industry: Direct flame paint booths are frequently used in the maritime industry for painting large surfaces of vessels, such as hulls and decks.

Aerospace Industry: Direct flame paint booths are used in the aerospace industry for painting large parts of aircraft, such as fuselages, wings, and tail sections.

Construction Sector: Direct flame paint booths can also be used in the construction sector for painting large surfaces of assembled structures, such as bridges, cranes, wind turbine blades, or other large machinery used in excavation and construction.

In general, direct flame paint booths are used in any sector that requires painting large parts and needs to accelerate the paint curing process, thus increasing production efficiency.

Advantages of Direct Flame Paint Booths

There are several advantages to using direct flame paint booths, including:

Lower Initial Investment: Direct flame paint booths are generally less expensive than other types of paint booths, offering a quickly recoverable return on investment (ROI).

Rapid Drying: Direct flame paint booths accelerate the paint curing process due to the absence of a combustion chamber and the high combustion efficiency, which is around 97% in direct flame systems.

Energy Savings: Thanks to the quick attainment of the set temperature, using direct flame for paint drying can save energy compared to other heating methods, such as combustion chamber heating.

Adaptability: The convection heating generated by direct flame paint booths makes them adaptable to various painting jobs, especially those involving large surfaces, such as vehicle bodies or metalworking parts.

Reduced Maintenance: Direct flame paint booths require less maintenance compared to other heating systems. Direct flame heating can be checked once a year, while combustion chamber heating systems require at least two annual checks. The intervention times are also minimized with direct flame systems.

In general, direct flame paint booths can be a beneficial choice for companies dealing with high volumes of painting work, thanks to their efficiency, flexibility, and potential energy savings.

Cabine di verniciatura a fiamma diretta

Considerations in Choosing a Gas-Powered Paint Booth

However, there are also considerations when choosing direct flame paint booths, including:

Environmental Impact: Direct flame paint booths can have a negative environmental impact due to greenhouse gas emissions produced during the combustion of natural gas or LPG.

High Fuel Costs: As witnessed in recent years, the cost of natural gas or LPG used for the gas combustion system can be high depending on the local market, especially when using large quantities of gas. Therefore, using heat recovery units in combination can reduce fuel costs by 50%.

Temperature Control: Temperature control inside the booth can be challenging to manage if the manufacturer lacks the necessary expertise to create modulation algorithms that influence flame regulation and the positioning of deflectors to optimize air flow through the burner, thus avoiding hot and cold spots in the booth.

Application Limitations: Direct flame paint booths may not be suitable for painting some materials sensitive to heat or flame or for painting small parts.

Safety Risks: The use of open flame for paint drying can pose a risk if not correctly managed and if periodic maintenance, as recommended by the manufacturer, is not carried out. It is essential that workers using direct flame paint booths adhere to all legal standards, receive adequate maintenance training, and follow appropriate safety procedures.

For all these reasons, it is essential to carefully assess the available fuel options and consider costs, availability, and environmental impacts before choosing the type of fuel to use in a direct flame paint booth.

Compatible Paints

In a direct flame paint booth, several types of paint can be used, depending on the specific requirements of the painting project. Generally, the paints used in a direct flame paint booth must be specifically designed for application with this type of system to ensure uniform and high-quality painting. Moreover, it is important to follow the paint manufacturer’s guidelines regarding dilution and drying time to achieve the best possible result. Some examples of paints that can be used in a direct flame paint booth are:

Solvent-Based Paints: These are paints based on organic solvents that evaporate during the drying process, leaving a paint film on the surface. This type of paint has good adhesion and resistance to water and wear but can be toxic and flammable.

Water-Based Paints: These are paints that use water as a solvent instead of organic solvents. They are less toxic and more environmentally friendly than solvent-based paints but may require more drying time. They are used in automotive painting for second coat applications. The application requires attention and expertise since surface preparation and paint application are crucial to achieve a high-quality and durable finish.

Polyurethane-Based Paints: Polyurethane-based paints are known for their durability and resistance and are often used for painting large parts, such as truck or bus bodies.

Epoxy Paints: These are two-component paints that use an epoxy resin as a binder. They are very hard and resistant to water, chemicals, and wear, making them suitable for painting metal parts that need to withstand corrosive chemicals.

Acrylic Paints: Acrylic-based paints are often used for painting plastic parts but can also be used for painting metal or wood parts.

Vinyl Paints: Vinyl-based paints are known for their weather resistance and are often used for painting parts exposed to atmospheric agents, such as bridges.

Conclusion

In general, direct flame paint booths can be a beneficial choice for companies dealing with high volumes of painting work, thanks to their efficiency, flexibility, and potential energy savings. However, it is essential to carefully consider all aspects, including disadvantages, before deciding which type of paint booth to use for a painting project.